Undocumented and DACA-status applicants will be considered under the University’s need-blind admission policy, and Brown will meet 100 percent of each student’s demonstrated financial need upon matriculation.

PROVIDENCE, R.I. [Brown University] — Beginning with the class entering in fall 2017, Brown University will consider first-time, first-year undergraduate applicants who hold undocumented or DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) status and graduate from a U.S. high school as if they were U.S. citizens or permanent residents.

The change means that like first-time, first-year domestic students, undocumented and DACA applicants will be considered under the University’s need-blind admission policy, and that Brown will meet 100 percent of each student’s demonstrated financial need upon matriculation. Brown is among a growing number of institutions eliminating the distinction between domestic applicants and undocumented and DACA students in the admission process.

“We seek to ensure that undocumented and DACA-status students who have been raised and educated in this country and apply for admission to Brown are treated fairly and equitably,” said Brown University Provost Richard M. Locke. “This approach is consistent with our core values and with Brown’s commitment to advancing knowledge and discovery by attracting and supporting the most talented and promising students and scholars to campus.”

The new approach follows the February 2016 release of an action plan to create a more diverse and inclusive campus and subsequent discussions among students and senior academic leaders at Brown about undocumented and DACA-status students.

Brown’s admission process has been open to undocumented students for several years. Brown meets 100 percent of the demonstrated financial need of all admitted students, with first-time, first-year domestic students admitted through a need-blind process, and international and transfer students through need-aware process. Previously, undocumented and DACA-status applicants were reviewed and admitted as part of the need-aware admission application process for international students.  

Because of their status, undocumented students are unable to apply for federal financial aid, and there are limits to programs for which DACA-status student are eligible. Therefore, Brown will continue to meet the full demonstrated need of these students through University financial aid.  

Brown’s Office of Admission will continue to partner with organizations, such as the nonprofit QuestBridge college match organization, to attract exceptional students to Brown, including undocumented and DACA-status students. It will also communicate Brown’s policies in support of these students more clearly and prominently in the admission process.

Additionally, the University will strengthen academic and social supports for undocumented and DACA-status students on campus by coordinating and clarifying resources available to them through the First-Generation College and Low-Income Student Center, the Dean of the College, and Campus Life and Student Services.

“Regardless of background, country of origin or citizenship status, Brown aims to prepare every student for a productive, purposeful and fulfilling life after college,” said Maud Mandel, dean of the college. “These modifications will help us to achieve our goals of ensuring that every student can benefit from a Brown education and contribute fully as active and engaged members of the community.”