Bacteria swim with bodies and flagella

: Using a new technique to track the swimming motion of a single bacterium, researchers have discovered that the movement of the bacterium’s body — not just thrust from the flagellum — allow movement through fluids. The finding could shed new light on the evolution of cell body shape.
Questions for Dr. Eli Adashi

Time to end ban on gay blood donors

Sexually active gay men face a lifetime ban on blood donation in the United States but not in some other countries, such as Italy, where people are screened based on individual risk rather than broad identities. In a newly published commentary, Dr. Eli Y. Adashi argues it is time for the United States to replace the outdated and discriminatory ban with a modern, fair, and sensible approach.

KieranTimberlake to design new engineering building

The architecture firm KieranTimberlake will design a new building for Brown's School of Engineering. The facility will provide new lab space for the School's expanding research efforts. Construction is scheduled to begin in 2015.

Students relish Solar Decathlon experience

The 2014 Solar Decathlon has drawn to a close. The RISD/Brown/Erfurt team brought home top ten finishes in four events, along with an experience they’ll never forget. Techstyle Haus, their one-of-a-kind solar home, now heads for its final stop — an arts retreat in France where it will serve as housing for visiting artists.

Diagnostic criteria for Christianson syndrome

A new study provides the most definitive characterization of the autism-like intellectual disability disorder Christianson syndrome and provides the first diagnostic criteria to help doctors and families identify and understand the condition. Initial evidence suggests CS could affect tens of thousands of boys worldwide.

Brown physicists part of “second generation” dark matter experiments

LUX-ZEPLIN, a dark matter search experiment co-founded by Brown physicist Rick Gaitskell, is among the "next generation" of dark matter searches endorsed by DOE and NSF. The new detector will build on the work done by the LUX experiment, which is currently operating deep underground in South Dakota. Construction on the supersized detector is scheduled to begin in 2016.

Virtual crowds produce real behavior insights

William Warren’s research group is advancing virtual reality technology in the service of studying the science of the swarm: how patterns of crowd movement emerge from individual behaviors. He described his work June 29 in a keynote address to a conference in Vancouver.

Researchers discover boron “buckyball”

The discovery of buckyballs — soccer-ball-shaped molecules of carbon — helped usher in the nanotechnology era. Now, Lai-Sheng Wang’s research group and colleagues from China have shown that boron, carbon’s neighbor on the periodic table, can form a cage-like molecule similar to the buckyball. Until now, such a boron structure had only been a theoretical speculation. The researchers dubbed their newfound nanostructure “borospherene.”

Sustaining today's resources for future users

With sustainability a constant and global concern, the present-day users of both non-renewable and potentially renewable resources must take into account what will be left over for future generations. In a study in the July 11 issue of Nature, researchers devise an 'Intergenerational Goods Game' to determine what mechanisms can maintain cooperation with the future. Louis Putterman, chair and professor of economics, explains the study in a “News and Views” column in that issue. He spoke with Courtney Coelho about the research and its implications.

Grant supports migraine research

Four Brown Institute for Brain Science faculty members who study pain recently earned a $100,000 award to study the physiology and mechanisms of migraines.